$868,000 :: 1783 Norfolk, Birmingham MI, 48009

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Property Photo

4 beds, 3 full, 1 part baths
Home size: 3,705 sq ft
Lot Size: 8,276 sq ft
Added: 05/20/14, Last Updated: 05/22/14
Property Type: 2 Story, Residential
MLS Number: 31194103
Community: Birmingham (63192)
Tract: J LEE BAKER CO’S BIRMINGHAM HILLS SUB
Status: Sold

Custom new construction just completed and ready for immediate occupancy in the highly desirable Birmingham Hills Subdivision and Birmingham Country Club! Brick and stone elevation and Hardie Lap siding, gourmet kitchen with Downsview custom cabinets, granite countertops,hardwood floors, butlers pantry, Knotty Alder Library with custom build ins, beamed ceiling kitchen/family room, fabulous master suite designed to perfection, guest suite on the third floor, many other upgrades.

Listed with Hoyt Real Estate Inc


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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$868,000 :: 1783 Norfolk, Birmingham MI, 48009

Thumbnail for 1668
Property Photo

4 beds, 3 full, 1 part baths
Home size: 3,705 sq ft
Lot Size: 8,276 sq ft
Added: 05/20/14, Last Updated: 05/22/14
Property Type: 2 Story, Residential
MLS Number: 31194103
Community: Birmingham (63192)
Tract: J LEE BAKER CO’S BIRMINGHAM HILLS SUB
Status: Sold

Custom new construction just completed and ready for immediate occupancy in the highly desirable Birmingham Hills Subdivision and Birmingham Country Club! Brick and stone elevation and Hardie Lap siding, gourmet kitchen with Downsview custom cabinets, granite countertops,hardwood floors, butlers pantry, Knotty Alder Library with custom build ins, beamed ceiling kitchen/family room, fabulous master suite designed to perfection, guest suite on the third floor, many other upgrades.

Listed with Hoyt Real Estate Inc


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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Homeowners Insurance: How to Know If You Need More Coverage

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side of green house constructed ...

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ShutterstockWhen you buy homeowners insurance, you don’t base your coverage limits on what you paid for the house.

By Arthur Murray

Most homeowners keep track of changes in the estimated value of their homes. If the estimate increases, does it mean you should increase the limits of your home insurance coverage to accommodate the hike? The quick answer — maybe, maybe not. Why the hedge? It depends on why the value of your home has increased.

The good news? If what increased is the possible sale value, you’re likely in good shape, insurance-wise. The amount of home insurance coverage you need doesn’t change based on real estate prices.

How real estate prices work: Real estate prices focus on demand. The more demand there is for a house, the more a seller can ask to be paid. Demand depends on a number of factors and can

Location is important: It determines the types of threats a home can face.

change over time.

An example: Location is one of the most important factors in real estate. If a home is in a trendy neighborhood, a great school district or near desirable shopping or entertainment venues, its market value could be greater than that of a house in another location. On the other hand, neighborhoods can fall off “popular” lists, school districts can be redrawn, and stores and theaters can close. That same house likely wouldn’t sell for nearly as much.

Most recently, home values have increased in many parts of the country as the real estate market heated back up after the recession. As more buyers enter the market, sellers can demand higher prices.

How home insurance prices work: When you buy home insurance, you don’t base your coverage limits on what you paid for the house. Instead, you buy enough dwelling coverage so that you can rebuild what’s likely your largest investment in case it is destroyed by a covered event such as fire or wind.

Factors taken into account in arriving at this amount — also called the replacement value of your house — include the size of the house and local construction costs.

Insurance providers then consider the amount of risk presented by a particular home and policyholder. Again, location is important: It determines the types of threats a home can face. For example, it costs much more to insure a home in Tornado Alley than it would for a similar house in a region with less-volatile weather.

One thing that’s not a consideration is the land that comes with the house. In most cases, events that could destroy a house leave the property under it relatively unscathed. You still own it.

So do I need more insurance coverage? It depends on which value of your home increased. If just the market value increased — because more people are buying houses in your neighborhood, new amenities are built there or for some other reason — then you don’t need to boost your coverage.

However, there are two ways the replacement value of your home could change:

o. Local construction costs increase. If there’s a construction boom in your city, it’s possible that the increased demand could send prices soaring. That’s why it’s a good idea to occasionally run the numbers on a coverage calculator.

o. You renovate or add to your house. Remodeling the kitchen, for example, can add $13,000 to $37,000 to your home’s replacement cost.

Under either of these scenarios, you should increase your home insurance coverage limits to match the new replacement cost.

Does this mean you’ll pay substantially more for your policy? Not necessarily. Shop your coverage with a number of providers; each uses different factors to determine quotes. Ask about discounts. Many companies offer substantial price breaks for buying home and auto coverage or even for things as simple as deadbolt locks. Finally, consider raising the deductible, as this can help cut premiums.

It’s a smart idea to keep an eye on the value of your home. Don’t jump to conclusions if that number increases. Instead, investigate the reason for the increase and evaluate whether you need to take action.

Arthur Murray writes for HomeInsurance.com, an online insurance resource for homeowners and drivers across the country. The HomeInsurance.com blog provides fresh tips and advice on a range of financial topics to help homeowners and homebuyers make educated decisions about their insurance purchases.

Note: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or position of Zillow or AOL.

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Why America's Most Affordable Homes Likely Aren't for Sale

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ShutterstockRoughly 1 in 3 who owned homes within the bottom third of home values were underwater in the first quarter

By Cory Hopkins

The affordable homes most likely to be sought after by first-time homebuyers are also those most likely to be kept off the market because their current owners are in negative equity, or underwater. Underwater homeowners — those who owe more on their mortgages than their homes are worth — have a very difficult time listing and selling their homes, even if they want to, without engaging in a short sale or dipping into their savings.

Among all homeowners with a mortgage nationwide, roughly 1 in 3 (30.2 percent) who owned homes within the bottom third of home values were underwater in the first quarter, according to the first quarter Zillow Negative Equity Report. That’s almost three times as many as in the top third of

“It’s hard to overstate just how much of a drag on the housing market negative equity really is, especially at the lower end of the market.”

homes (10.7 percent). Among the middle tier, 18.1 percent of homeowners with a mortgage were underwater in the first quarter.

The national negative equity rate fell to 18.8 percent in the first quarter, with almost 9.7 million American homeowners with a mortgage underwater. More than one-third of homeowners with a mortgage (36.9 percent) are effectively underwater, unable to sell their homes for enough profit to afford down payments on new ones and comfortably meet expenses related to selling, such as real estate agents’ fees and closing costs.

“The unfortunate reality is that housing markets look to be swimming with underwater borrowers for years to come,” said Zillow Chief Economist Dr. Stan Humphries. “It’s hard to overstate just how much of a drag on the housing market negative equity really is, especially at the lower end of the market, which represents those homes typically most affordable for first-time buyers. Negative equity constrains inventory, which helps drive home values higher, which in turn makes those homes that are available that much less affordable.”

Negative equity has fallen for eight consecutive quarters, but fell at its lowest pace in almost two years in the first quarter as home value growth slowed. Negative equity fell from 25.4 percent in the first quarter of 2013 and 19.4 percent in the fourth quarter, while the pace of annual home value growth slowed to 5.7 percent in the first quarter, from 6.6 percent at the end of the fourth quarter. Looking ahead, the national negative equity rate is expected to fall to 17 percent of all homeowners with a mortgage by the first quarter of 2015, according to the Zillow Negative Equity Forecast.

More underwater homeowners are freed from negative equity as home values rise, eventually surpassing the amount still owed on a mortgage. If home values rise more slowly, negative equity will recede more slowly. Homeowners are also freed from negative equity if their homes are foreclosed on, as homeowners’ debt is wiped from lenders’ books following foreclosure.

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How to Get Ready Now for the Storms Ahead

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Staten Island's Midland Beach community is still rebuilding after it was hit by Hurricane Sandy as the storm made it's way throu

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Damon Dahlen, Huffington PostHomes in the Midland Beach community on New York’s Staten Island damaged by Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

By Geoff Williams

Meteorologists must be feeling a lot of job security these days, given the winter that never seemed to end and the summer-like storms and tornadoes appearing throughout the Midwest this spring.
Meanwhile, for the Atlantic coast, hurricane season begins June 1, and NASA satellites and ocean sensors are suggesting we might be in for a formidable El Nino. That means the water in the central and eastern Pacific could be warmer than normal, which could bring about more extreme storms.
If you’re worried that your house or condo isn’t prepared for a pounding, here are some steps you can take to prepare.

Pretend a storm is coming now. That is, don’t wait until you hear a hurricane, tornado or thunderstorm of the century is coming. Maria LaRosa, a meteorologist who co-hosts “AMHQ with Sam Champion” on The Weather Channel, thinks about storms day and night and says that she always feels bad when she sees people standing in line, waiting for batteries and gas for the

“It’s always smart to be overprepared than underprepared.”

generator. “Those are things you can take care of beforehand, so you don’t have to be scrambling at the last minute. Don’t be that person,” she advises.

Sabine Schoenberg, a home improvement blogger at sabineshome.com who lives in Greenwich, Connecticut, agrees. “You don’t want to get caught up in the long lines at the grocery store,” she says. “Dedicate a section in your pantry or pantry cabinet for water, freeze-dried and canned food for storm emergencies.” She advises storing three days’ worth of food.

Schoenberg also suggests having a generator ready. “They’re the new must-haves,” she says.
LaRosa has one that’s big enough to run a refrigerator and plug in a few things. “It isn’t a mega one that would run the whole house, but it’s one we feel comfortable having,” she says. “So that’s probably what I’d recommend — take stock of what you think you would need if you didn’t have electricity for a few days. You might want one for your sump pump, for instance, so your basement stays dry.”

This is also a great time to check in with your insurance adjuster if you haven’t thought about your homeowners insurance for some time. “Before a disaster strikes is the time to sit down with your insurance agent to be certain you are properly insured,” says Greg Raab, operations director for Adjusters International, a public adjusting and disaster recovery company headquartered in Utica, New York. If you live in an area that has hurricanes and floods, he stresses the importance of getting insurance that will protect you.

Raab adds that standard homeowners policies don’t include flood insurance. “Though limited in what it covers, flood insurance is provided through the National Flood Insurance Program and works differently from standard homeowners coverage,” he says.

Secure the house. If a hurricane or tornado is making a beeline for your home, there isn’t much you can do to truly protect it. In that respect, LaRosa says, “A lot of times we show people (on television) boarding up windows if a huge storm is coming, but time and time again, it’s been proven that it’s a waste of time.”

If time is short and this looks like a punishing storm, LaRosa says you’re better off gathering family items and important paperwork, preparing your shelter and fine-tuning your evacuation route. But you do want to secure your home. Eric Van De Steeg, owner of Van De Steeg Roofing & Associates in Oklahoma City, recommends installing window shutters, roof clips and garage door braces. Van De Steeg is referring to functional, non-decorative window shutters. Garage door braces are fastened to the garage door to help keep it from blowing away. Roof clips serve the same function, only they’re installed on a roof.

None of these items are exactly cheap. Multiple shutters can cost hundreds of dollars. Garage door braces typically run $100 to $200. Roof clips often cost less than a buck, but unless you’re something of a handyman, you’ll want to hire a professional to install them.

“We haven’t been seeing as many people utilizing garage door braces, roof clips and actual window shutters as you would think, even with the rise of severe weather and the change in weather patterns,” Van De Steeg admits. But he recommends that people who live in areas frequently hit by hurricanes or tornadoes to consider utilizing them.

“When you’re dealing with EF3-, 4- and 5-level tornadoes, you’re facing wind gusts of up to over 200 mph. It’s always smart to be overprepared than underprepared. We don’t want people to lose their homes,” Van De Steeg says.

Tree care. Sure, they’re beautiful and give us oxygen, but some trees are your enemy, just biding their time until lightning causes them to come crashing through the living room window. If you’re unsure about a tree’s health, consider hiring an arborist to check it out and possibly remove it (expect to pay at least a few hundred dollars). But you may be able to determine on your own if it’s healthy or not. Look for bare branches at the top of the tree, which might be a sign your tree is in poor shape. Also, take a look near the base. Are roots sprawled out at one side of the tree? That could be a sign your tree will eventually fall over.

If trees are touching your roof, trim those back, Van De Steeg advises. “When the winds pick up, they’ll knock your tree limbs against your roof, and that scraping can pull up parts of the roof,” Van De Steeg says.

Even if your trees look healthy, you want to keep them that way. “Prune them and let the wind pass through them without a lot of damage,” Schoenberg suggests. She also advises regrading the ground around the trees, which means bringing in clay and soil to make the ground stronger. “Direct water to shed away, and avoid turning the soil into a sponge, because then the tree roots will have nothing to hold on to,” she says.

And don’t forget the rest of the landscaping, Van De Steeg cautions. “Keep debris out of your yard, and you can prevent minor damage from turning into major damage,” he says.

Make a plan. Know where to go when the storm comes. Some homes simply aren’t safe to remain in when the weather really gets rough.

“If you live in a mobile home and you’re under a tornado watch, this might be the night to spend at a friend’s home. Mobile homes just aren’t built to withstand a storm like that,” LaRosa says. If you have a family plan, she says it’s important the entire family knows the details. “Clue your kids in,” LaRosa says. “So if the plan is that if something happens, call grandma, or go to the house next door, your kids need to know that.”

That’s good advice, because all the worrying about the health of your house during a storm can be a bit misplaced. You never want to lose sight that your main concern isn’t your home — it’s the people living in it.

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The $1,000 Mansion You Have To See To Believe

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This Tudor has seven bedrooms, five bathrooms, 69 windows and a historic address. It’s also listed for $1,000.

This isn’t a joke, but part of a pl…

Read more: Detroit, Historic Homes, Boston Edison Detroit, Detroit Real Estate, Detroit Home Auction, Detroit Home Auctions 1000, HuffPost Home News

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